missouri

University of Missouri, MO, USA

Tomb #A 70/A 73/C 3/C 7

  • 14 pots and 1 vase: $291[1]Correspondence from Nancy Lapp to ASOR Corporation Representatives 1977, 058 Lapp-ASOR December 1977, ASOR Archival, Department of Anthropology, DePaul University, Chicago IL
  • Sold to University of Missouri
  • On display/Present Location: No, University of Missouri
  • Education purposes: Only for requested scholarly study

According to excavation records, Tomb A 70 was well preserved, despite it not being properly sealed. Due to this improper sealing, the pots in tomb had moved around the tomb over time. There was also a fragmentary bone pile in A 70, and to the left of this bone pile was a row of four broken skulls.

There were not enough bones present for four full skeletons, which may suggest that there was selectivity when it came to which bones were placed in the tombs. There were seven pottery vessels present, something what would be considered odd for a tomb of four people.[2]Thomas R. Schaub and Walter E. Rast,Bâb Edh-Dhra: Excavation in the Cemetery Directed by Paul W. Lapp (Winona Lake: American School of Oriental Research, 1989) (p.110)

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Figure 1. Diagram of A 65W that shows the placement of A 73 from Bâb Edh-Dhra: Excavation in the Cemetery Directed by Paul W. Lapp p.83
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Figure 2. Diagram of the pottery from the A 73 tomb from Bâb Edh-Dhra: Excavation in the Cemetery Directed by Paul W. Lapp p.325

Tomb A 73 does not have much excavation information written about it as it was poorly preserved. It may have been a burial chamber or a shallower pit burial, which had been cut into the north side of shaft tomb A 65W. Tomb A 73 was cut after tomb A 65W had been silted. Only three pieces of pottery were found in A 73.[3]Thomas R. Schaub and Walter E. Rast,Bâb Edh-Dhra: Excavation in the Cemetery Directed by Paul W. Lapp (Winona Lake: American School of Oriental Research, 1989) (p.324)

Tomb C 3 was unsealed and found in poor condition. Its shaft and ceiling were not defined and the stone blocking the entrance to the tomb was incomplete. Because of these structural issues debris had filled up the tomb and the artifacts and human remains in the tomb were covered in sterile sand.

Tomb C 3 appeared to be a single burial tomb, as there was only one adult human skull amongst the fragmented remains. The layout of the bones suggests an articulated burial, as it appeared that the head of the individual was laid out to the north and the feet of the individual laid to the south. Along with the bones, four pottery vessels discovered in the C 3 tomb, as well as a bone fragment believed to have been a bone whistle and beads that were suspected to have placed around the neck of the deceased individual4.

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Figure 3. Diagram of the C3 tomb from Bâb Edh-Dhra: Excavation in the Cemetery Directed by Paul W. Lapp p.193
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Figure 4. Photograph of the C3 tomb from Bâb Edh-Dhra: Excavation in the Cemetery Directed by Paul W. Lapp p.194
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Figure 5. Diagram of the C3 ceramics from Bâb Edh-Dhra: Excavation in the Cemetery Directed by Paul W. Lapp p.195

Tomb C 7 was found under the northeast floor of a charnel house. Because of the construction of the charnel house, C 7 was extremely damaged. There were no human remains found in C 7. However, like other tombs in Cemetery C, there were a broken pieces of a juglet in the tomb, as well as a carinated bowl sherd. The bowl sherd was discovered within Charnel House C,[4]Thomas R. Schaub and Walter E. Rast,Bâb Edh-Dhra: Excavation in the Cemetery Directed by Paul W. Lapp (Winona Lake: American School of Oriental Research, 1989) (p.192-193)   yet was suspected to have been apart of Tomb C 7.[5]Thomas R. Schaub and Walter E. Rast,Bâb Edh-Dhra: Excavation in the Cemetery Directed by Paul W. Lapp (Winona Lake: American School of Oriental Research, 1989) (p.202)

Tomb Groups C 3, C 7, A 70, A 73 were sold to the University of Missouri, located in Columbia, Missouri, for a grand total of $291.[6]Correspondence from Nancy Lapp to ASOR Corporation Representatives 1977, 058 Lapp-ASOR December 1977, ASOR Archival, Department of Anthropology, DePaul University, Chicago IL  In a 1981 letter to Nancy Lapp, Dr. Jane Biers, curator of ancient art, stated that the University had removed the pots from display and placed them in storage, but they would be accessible for study to anyone who reached out to the department.[7]Correspondence from Dr. Jane Biers to Nancy Lapp, 19 February 1981.   Currently, the artifacts from Bab adh-Dhra are still in storage and only available for scholarly study at the University of Missouri.[8]Correspondence from Benton Kidd to Cheyenne Danforth, 22 January 2018.

References

References
1, 6 Correspondence from Nancy Lapp to ASOR Corporation Representatives 1977, 058 Lapp-ASOR December 1977, ASOR Archival, Department of Anthropology, DePaul University, Chicago IL
2 Thomas R. Schaub and Walter E. Rast,Bâb Edh-Dhra: Excavation in the Cemetery Directed by Paul W. Lapp (Winona Lake: American School of Oriental Research, 1989) (p.110)
3 Thomas R. Schaub and Walter E. Rast,Bâb Edh-Dhra: Excavation in the Cemetery Directed by Paul W. Lapp (Winona Lake: American School of Oriental Research, 1989) (p.324)
4 Thomas R. Schaub and Walter E. Rast,Bâb Edh-Dhra: Excavation in the Cemetery Directed by Paul W. Lapp (Winona Lake: American School of Oriental Research, 1989) (p.192-193)
5 Thomas R. Schaub and Walter E. Rast,Bâb Edh-Dhra: Excavation in the Cemetery Directed by Paul W. Lapp (Winona Lake: American School of Oriental Research, 1989) (p.202)
7 Correspondence from Dr. Jane Biers to Nancy Lapp, 19 February 1981.
8 Correspondence from Benton Kidd to Cheyenne Danforth, 22 January 2018.